Stock Photography

Koreshan Unity Settlement Historic Site on film


The Panetrary Court, built in 1896

A recent camping trip on an off-weekend between motorsport photo shoots at the Koreshan Unity Settlement Historic Site at Koreshan State Park in Estero , Florida seemed like the perfect opportunity to pull out one of my old 35mm film cameras and a roll of expired T-Max 400 and indulge my new/old obsession: film photography.

The Historic Site, which is all that remains of a religious community established in the late 1800's near Ft. Myers, Florida, is a photographically target-rich environment, just begging to be photographed on black and white film!



More than 100 years ago, the original settlers of the community moved here with visions of establishing a city which they hoped would grow to as many a s 10 million people and be a worldwide center for their religion. This vision did not quite pan out, and by the 1980's all the residents of the community were gone, leaving behind their story and the few physical structures that remain.



With the limited time I had, I made a couple of trips through the set, photographing it both digitally as well as on 35mm film. I used a Canon EOS 650, which was Canon's original EOS autofocus body back in the 80's, which I had picked up at an online auction for next to nothing. The beauty of these old canon bodies is that you can use all your current canon mount lenses with them, and their functions are fairly intuitive for a Canon shooter.


Interior view, Damkohler House, built in 1882

For someone like myself, who spent 20 years in film photography before the dawn of the digital age right about the turn of the century, it is hard to grasp the attraction I now feel for film photography, more than 15 years down the road from casting off all my old chemical-stained clothing. I think it has something to do with the deliberateness of the process, from determining the composition, focus and exposure to the finality of pressing the shutter button and advancing the film one more step toward the end of the roll, knowing that when the film is gone, the photography is over.



And, as someone recently told me, I am a glutton for punishment apparently, as I have even pulled all my old processing tanks out of storage, ordered chemical from
Amazon, and gone to work processing my own film. The excitement as I anticipate the images on the film is just like it was for me in the old days, when there was no other way to produce photographic images, I find that I am still unable to wait for the full duration of the fixing chemical time before I have pulled the wet film out of the fixer and am holding it up to the light with a magnifier to see what I've actually captured.


The Founder's House, built in 1896

Anyway, I was happy with the results of my hour spent at the Koreshan Unity Settlement with my old Canon EOS 650 and an expired roll of Kodak
T-Max 400, and would encourage any photography with a curiosity for the origins of his or her craft to pick up an old film camera and some film and give it a go. My belief is that it will only deepen your love for photography



To view my full 35mm film gallery from the Koreshan Unity Settlement, please
click here

About BCPix.com Privacy Policy

www.bcpix.com is the online home for the photographic archive of Florida-based photographer Brian Cleary. At this portal not only can you search and browse an ever-growing collection of photography covering more than 30 years, but many of the images are available for online purchase as editorial images, commercial images and/or personal use prints.


New Royalty-Free Web Banner Photo Gallery at BCPix.com



This week sees the launch of another new product forom BCpix.com: A gallery of wide, narrow royalty-free photographs designed to be used as website mastheads, page-wide horizontal blog content photos, and photos to be used in internet banner advertisements!
Click here to view Web Banner Galley



As you can see from these examples, the pictures are unique selections from the photo archive of Florida-based freelance photographer Brian Cleary which lend themselve to long, low cropping, often incorporating areas within the frame ideal for dropping in text, logos, etc.




The images are sized at 1200x250 pixels, wide enough for any web page and, of course, down-sizable to fit your specific needs. Priced affordably with a royalty-free license at $35 dollars per image and, of course, royalty-free means buy it once, use it in multiple placements whenever you like for as long as you like!


Click here to view Web Banner Galley

As always, the Photoshelter platform at bcpix.com provides for easy, searchable browsing, purchase and download of all the banner photos. Check back often, as new images are being added daily!



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About BCPix.com Privacy Policy

www.bcpix.com is the online home for the photographic archive of Florida-based photographer Brian Cleary. At this portal not only can you search and browse an ever-growing collection of photography covering more than 30 years, but many of the images are available for online purchase as editorial images, commercial images and/or personal use prints.

Photos to help rebuild history



After I started building my online photo archive several years ago, it wasn’t long before an unanticipated group of followers came to light and began e-mailing me with specific photo inquiries: scale model race car car builders are always on the lookout for photos of auto racing’s past to use as reference when they are assembling their projects.

Photos that show paint schemes, sponsors for specific events, decal positioning and size, etc. are invaluable in assuring the accuracy of a given finished model.

Over the past couple of years, I’ve filled several print orders for scale modelers and have incorporated a special print pricing structure with these clients in mind.

My print price schedule includes low-priced 4x6 and 5x7 prints for these folks who need accurate reference prints, but don’t want to break the bank when acquiring them.



The photo archives at bcpix.com include, but are not limited to the following: 1980’s NASCAR, Indy Car (IRL & CART), and the IMSA glory days of the GTP era. Of course I’m always updating my online catalogs as more images from the past are digitally archived!

The photo database is fully searchable, making it easy to find just the pictures you’re looking for.

Begin your search today by entering search terms in the box below:








If you can’t find what you’re looking for, don’t hesitate to drop me an e-mail at: brian@bcpix.com



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About BCPix.com Privacy Policy

www.bcpix.com is the online home for the photographic archive of Florida-based photographer Brian Cleary. At this portal not only can you search and browse an ever-growing collection of photography covering more than 30 years, but many of the images are available for online purchase as editorial images, commercial images and/or personal use prints.

A New Way to Market Royalty-Free Stock?



With the over-saturated stock photography market that the advent of digital photography and the ever-improving line of digital cameras has created, many of us photo veterans, who date back to the days of film, are having a hard time coming to terms with ultra- low commissions that the microstock houses are paying.

With that in mind, have somewhat limited options when it comes to marketing our work at prices with which we are comfortable.

One route is to build your own online archive and portfolio at places like Photoshelter, where I house an ever-growing collection of rights-managed and royalty-free photography.  One problem with this approach is that it is extremely tough to even get noticed in the sea of photography that is now online, which makes it very difficult to attract enough traffic to build a steady income.

There is another interesting option that has been around for a few years that I have recently discovered.

There are now several sites out there where merchants can sell their digital downloads, with the site proprietor taking a percentage of the sale price. While many people use these sites to market e-books, mp3’s, software, etc, it is also a viable platform from which to sell royalty-free stock photography and royalty-free video clips.

The site with which I am currently experimenting is the German=based Tradebit.com.

There are several things I like about the Tradebit model:

1) Tradebit is highly ranked with Alexa (as of today, 2381st in the US), ensuring a built-in traffic flow. While not all of these visitors will be looking for stock photography, at least you have a chance to get your tagged, keyworded files in front of thousands of potential buyers.

2) Tradebit offers several ways to get the URL of your homepage in front of the visitors to their site.

3) You can set the price for your offerings at whatever you want. If I’m not comfortable accepting the 30 perc ent of $1 sales that many of the microstock sitesw are offering, I can post the same photo at Tradebit at any price I wish. I may not make any sales, but I can always adjust the price as I see fit and don’t have to be frustrated at seeing my work being used while I pocket a 30 cent commission!

4) There are no monthly fees involved in dealing with Tradebit. Amazingly, you do not pay for them to house you uploads, they work only for a percentage any sales.

5) You are your own editor. There is no long curation process, where you are often told that your work is not suitable for sale on a particular site. You decide exactly what you want to post for sale, upload it and it is online, usually within a day and often almost instantly!

6) The offerings on Tradebit show up very quickly and competitively ranked in google searches.

7) Buyers on Tradebit are not required to maintain a user account. They simply find what they are looking for and download it, paying via PayPal. I’ve always felt that the easier it is for someone to buy something, the more likely they are to buy it.

8) You can easily create a variety of embedable widgets from your projects and place them in blog posts, on web pages, etc. (see example below):



So those are a few of the Pros to the Tradebit model. Are there any Cons? Of course. The Tradebit platform is sort of a self-serve process for both buyers and sellers. While the owner, Ralf, is very helpful and responsive to questions, it is often a process of feeling around the site to make things look and work the way you’d like. I’ve discovered a few amazing little hidden perks in my exploring (the ability to insert a clickable-to-my-site banner on my pages, for example).

Tradebit is only one of several options for merchants looking to do business on one of the digital download sites, and I selected it due to its traffic ranking and favorable reviews that I was able to find online.

The jury is still out on the effectiveness of marketing royalty-free stock photos on Tradebit, as I’m only about a week into my experiment, but could this be the new wave for photographers to battle the online microstock mega-sites?


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About BCPix.com Privacy Policy

www.bcpix.com is the online home for the photographic archive of Florida-based photographer Brian Cleary. At this portal not only can you search and browse an ever-growing collection of photography covering more than 30 years, but many of the images are available for online purchase as editorial images, commercial images and/or personal use prints.